Where does our school name come from?

 

Weld Square Primary school's name is firmly linked to Sir Frederick Aloysius Weld (1823-1891), a colonial Governor of Western Australia.

 

In December 1868 he was appointed governor of Western Australia and with his wife and six children arrived there in September 1869. The free settlers welcomed him as a family man with practical experience of pioneer farming. In his first six months of office he travelled 1200 miles (1931 km) on horseback, and visited every district of importance except the far north. He enjoyed getting about and seeing the country. In 1871 he rode to Albany and, with two white men and a native, made his way through partly unexplored country to Cape Leeuwin and back to Perth. Later that year he went by sea to inspect the pearling fleets at Nickol Bay (Roebourne) and the sheep stations inland; in 1873 he travelled 1000 miles (1609 km) in the Geraldton district. A keen observer and an accomplished correspondent, his letters and dispatches vividly depicted life in the colony. One of his first acts was to send John Forrest to find a possible route for a telegraph line to Adelaide. He also ordered the installation of 900 miles (1448 km) of internal line.

 

To find out more interesting details of Governor Weld and life in Colonial times you may find the following sites of interest:

 

Australian Dictionary of Biography

Wikipedia: Frederick Weld

Governor Frederick Weld to Cardinal Barnabo. 6 December 1873

The City of Adelaide The Splendid Clipper Ship

Ship Wreck Data base

Governor Weld's links to the former  nor-west pearling town called Cossack

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